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AHA ENSEMBLE

The Aha Ensemble have been working together since 2015 in the development of artists living with disability and impairment in South East Queensland. This performance ensemble was initiated by Daniele Constance in partnership with Access Arts, and established in response to Access Arts members requesting more professional development opportunities, specifically in performance making.

Since its first pilot program in 2015, Aha Ensemble has received support from Access Arts and Arts Queensland; and has continued to grow with live performances taking place at Anywhere Theatre Festival (Metro Arts, 2016), Undercover Artist Festival (Queensland Theatre Company, 2015); and two creative residencies with Metro Arts (2017 and 2018) to begin an artistic partnership with Phluxus2 Dance Collective. This physical theatre based ensemble explores the diverse uses, values and representations of the body. It challenges the norms of creating performance based works with differently abled bodies.

The key focus of this ensemble is to develop artists who experience disadvantage and disability within a professional arts context. Director, Daniele, believes that true integration and inclusive practices comes with collaboration from a diverse range of artists, is disability-led; and truly employs collaborative practices with a non hierarchical model. Together, we as diverse artists delve into a rigorous collaborative and artistic process to re-contextualise the boundaries of performance practice.

We are currently in creative development with our new work Explain Normal premiering at Metro Arts in October this year.

Aha performers’ individual practices include training and creating work across Brisbane, South East Queensland, nationally; and internationally in New York and Korea.

Ensemble members include: Kayah Guenther, Allycia Staples, Mitchell Runcie, Megan West, Tara Heard, Rebecca Dostal, Ruby Donohoe, David Waldie. It is always open to new members.

*While Aha Ensemble received support from Access Arts, the collective now train independently and seek a sustainable model for their growth and development.